Small Business Saturday and Every Day

It’s Small Business Saturday!

To say that this year was difficult for small businesses would be an understatement. The pandemic struck communities that thrive on small business especially hard, and shook up business operations across the country for years to come.

Every year, we celebrate Small Business Saturday; a shopping holiday in the U.S. honored after Thanksgiving Day. Its’ purpose is to drive some of the busiest shopping activity of the year towards small businesses. Although we will celebrate this upcoming Saturday, we’re urging you to consider making it a constant in your day to day.

Fuel your local economy, keep providing jobs in your neighborhood, support your neighbors efforts to stay in business, and encourage continued growth in your community.

Discover these small businesses near you that we will be showcasing this upcoming weekend. Hear their stories, what drives their business, and how they’re coping with the impact of the pandemic:

PCL Salon Studio – Northgate, Seattle

Palacia Scott’s salon sits on the corner of a vibrant and diverse neighborhood in Northgate, Seattle. Although current restrictions have heavily impacted the way her business is usually operated, she has only used the time to enhance her services, finding ways to make accommodations for every type of client that walks in through her doors.

“During this time, we have to band together to support and encourage one another. We’re meant to work together… We have to ensure that we all make it [through this] together.”

Palacia actively uses Business Impact NW classes and mentor support, “I was on the verge of giving up. Things were not going well. I reached out to Business Impact NW, and got a mentor. Slowly but surely, I got into it a bit more… the resources and support are unending.”

Support PCL Salon any day of the week and any season by visiting their website.

 

Alexandra’s Macarons – Central District, Seattle

Alexandra Greenwald only opened her shop in the Central District four weeks ago, yet the doors are bustling with families and macaron-hungry groups of people.

As people claim their outdoor seating spots, or sneak to find a spot in the ‘Secret Garden’ behind the shop, Alexandra and her crew weave through the kitchen to fill coffee cups and package treats.

“During this interesting time… we’d love to have people come in masked up to support us. It is so important to shop small and local, support small business as much as you can! Even just sharing [their stuff] – it goes a long way!”

Alexandra mentioned how the support at Business Impact NW has helped her along the way, “I took a grow and thrive class and 1:1 business coaching from Business Impact NW… it really fortified a lot of ideas I had for my business [that] I didn’t know how to fine tune,” 

Drop on by Alexandras Macarons and learn more about their offerings by visiting their website.

 

Yoga Wild – Hilltop, Tacoma // Online

Casey Hubbell co-founded the unique approach to yoga that is Yoga Wild. Although this cozy, atmospheric space isn’t being occupied at the moment – she powers on through online yoga classes.

Yoga Wild is just as flexible as you’d imagine a trained yogi. In just 2 years, the space has transformed from storage closet, to minimalist mindful retreat, to full video production studio.

“We are on three platforms right now [for accessibility], we still take the time to care for ourselves, care for our communities, care for nature. This is one of the reasons we are not doing in-person classes right now, [it’s why] we’re committed to doing online only classes.”

Learn more about Yoga Wild and their classes by visiting their website.

 

Follow us on social media this weekend to hear more about each business and more to come for #SmallBusinessSaturday and #SmallBusinessEveryday

 

About the author

Communications Coordinator at Business Impact NW

Osmir "Oz" Díaz is the Communications Coordinator at Business Impact NW,
dedicated to amplifying the work of diverse entrepreneurs online and offline.

Oz holds a variety of skills in digital marketing that she applies to her work for racial equity and justice in the digital landscape.

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